Mogul’s Tiffany Pham Aims To Unite And Uplift Female Voices

Mogul’s Tiffany Pham

Aims To Unite And Uplift Female Voices

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Tiffany Pham, Founder of female-oriented social platform Mogul, is hoping to continue the momentum from the Women’s March, by uniting millions of young women in protest across college campuses.

“It’s a campaign that emerged organically and took off like wildfire across college campuses,” said Pham, the Founder and CEO of women-focused media network, Mogul, of her #ReadMyLips campaign. “It’s a campaign of women sending messages directly to the White House [voicing concern for Trump’s administration].”

The #ReadMyLips campaign, which now includes students from thousands of schools, began with 24 universities including Harvard, Yale, NYU, Columbia, Cornell, Stanford, and Wellesley. According to Pham, participant statements are printed and placed inside statues- incidentally designed by Saturday Night Live veterans-and delivered to the White House.

“We want to ensure women’s voices are heard,” says Pham, whose life focus has been and continues to be empowering women through access to communication and content.

Pham’s platform, Mogul, which she describes as a “social platform enabling women to connect and get opportunities from each other,” now has 18 million readers (aged 18 to 34 years old) per week across 196 countries and 30,470 cities, according to Pham.

“Our community is made up of upwardly mobile rising stars,” says Pham. We are aspiring to inspire incredible women who are doing incredible things.”

The Beginning

“Essentially my vision for Mogul was inspired by my family,” says Pham. “I had grown up in a family that had been for many generations in media and I wanted to follow their footsteps. From early age made my mind up I would provide information access to the world.”

Pham, who grew up in Plano, Texas, and learned how to master English through television shows and movies, says she saw from a young age how important access to information was.

“I saw how media was such a powerful tool especially for learning and education and I never forgot that experience,” says Pham.

It was during her time at Yale University that Pham decided she would create a company for women, with the goal of empowering them through access to information. Pham then attended Harvard Business School she worked for four years in media for various executives at BBC, HBO and CBS, across television and radio.

“I got to see a lot of different types of media,” said Pham, who worked with the Mayor of Beijing on a new venture; an international screenwriting competition. “It was one of the first attempts to reach through cultural gaps between the US and Beijing at that time. I found top talent in the US and had them submit screenplays oriented around Beijing.”

Through her project in China, Pham, who was working three jobs and producing films on the side, began to see through her goal of providing access to information across the world. A few months later Pham found herself listed in Forbes 30 Under 30.

“The final catalyst towards launching Mogul was one day I woke up and all these young women around the world started to write me hundreds and thousands of letters,” says Pham, regarding the reaction to her feature. “I started writing back to every single letter and started to realize they were telling me my messages were changing their lives. I thought ‘what if we could exchange information and share our journeys’?”

“Where were the women’s voices?”

After a couple of weeks, Pham taught herself programming and built the first iteration of Mogul on a simple platform, which she launched in 2014. Pham’s goal was to offer women that chance to upload-content in real time and see what’s trending in terms of women’s conversations around the world. According to Pham, Mogul had 1 million users in the first month, a number she attributes to a core database of passionate women who all shared it with their respective networks. Another impressive feat? According to Pham, the site became immediately profitable, and thus self-supporting and sustainable, thanks to its large reach.

“I ultimately knew that what I was creating, as a Millennial myself, would be supremely helpful,” says Pham. “It would be for my own personal usage; for me, for my friends, for the young women writing to me. Ultimately I realize all these young women in my life were sharing it, and I saw how much it was resonating and realized how much it was needed. Reddit and Wikipedia (whose authors are 91 percent men) are similar platforms plats yet they are catering to mostly men.”

The Partners

Mogul currently includes two arms in its business model; Mogul Studios, which supports the creation of content with brand partners like IBM, Estée Lauder, and Samsung; as well as Mogul At Work, an employee platform where women can share information about their workplace, and where jobs are posted.

According to Pham, Mogul was commissioned by the NYC Department of education to train 100,00 teachers in gender equality training.

According to Pham, for each dollar generated by Mogul At Work, Mogul provides free access to 62 million girls in need of education, in partnership with the United Nations, beginning with India, Pakistan, Canada, Kenya, Myanmar, and Egypt.

“With world-changing partnerships such as with UN Women, we will be distributing free educational resources to over 62 million women across 93 countries, beginning with Kenya, Sierra Leone, Nepal, India, Pakistan, and the Caribbean,” says Pham. “With the launch of our partnership, Mogul and UN Women will now be accelerating educational and economic opportunities for women worldwide. We are proud to make this global impact together.”

According to Pham she is currently focused on continuing to grow her platform, with no plans to slow down.

“Our aim to take this to new heights,” says Pham. “We built a strong foundations to make a big impact on women globally and that model is one that has enabled Mogul to become a highly sustainable, highly profitable social enterprise. We want to take it to next level, continuing to fortify and scale internationally, and through mobile expansion to new women abroad.”

When it comes to the future of media, as a whole, Pham believes the democratization of content will continue.

“I believe that in the future everyone will be creating content in some way,” says Pham. “In the end what will differentiate that content is authenticity. Brands are creating content, so are influencers, consumers, and businesses. That’s why the Mogul platform has positioned itself to become a daily destination for all these corresponding parties. Mogul will enable them to reach women.”

The Quick 10

1. What app do you most use?

Postmates.

2. What’s the first thing you do in the morning?

Visualize the day ahead for success.

3. Name a business mogul you admire.

Mark Zuckerberg. Oprah Winfrey.

4. What product do you wish you had invented?

Dry shampoo.

5. What is your spirit animal?

Pug!

6. What is your life motto?

“A No is a Not Right Now that will turn into a Yes.”

7. Name your favorite work day snack.

Hot chocolate.

8. What’s something that’s always in your handbag?

Red lipstick.

9. What’s the most inspiring place you’ve traveled to?

Vietnam.

10. Desert Island. Three things, go.

Coconut. Water. A wonderful book.

Belisa Silva

Belisa is an editor with more than 10 years of experience. Prior to SWAAY, she worked as freelance writer, covering lifestyle, fashion and beauty industries. Belisa was a Market Editor at Women's Wear Daily for five years, where she interviewed rockstar business women like Drew Barrymore, Jennifer Lopez and Iman. Belisa also contributes to Cosmetic Executive Women, where she highlights female executives making an impact in the beauty industry.

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